Posted in Events News Veterinary Services on Nov 22, 2019 | no responses.

With our upcoming visit by Santa’s Reindeer, we thought we would treat you to some Reindeer facts and add to the excitement about meeting this amazing animal in person! The Reindeer will be visiting Belle Mead Animal Hospital on Saturday, December 14, 2019 from 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Reindeer 2015 Belle Mead Animal Hospital

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did you know…

  1. Reindeer live in the Northern parts of North America including Canada and Alaska. They also live in Europe, Russia and Greenland in the tundra regions (as well as the North Pole with Santa!)
  2. Reindeer are also known as Caribou. In Europe they are called Reindeer most of the time. However, in America, we only call them Reindeer when they are domesticated. Otherwise, in the wild we call them Caribou. (Their scientific name, by the way, is Rangifer Tarasndus).
  3. Reindeer are herbivores meaning they eat plants.
  4. A Reindeer can live up to 15 years in the wild and can weigh from 240 to 700 pounds.
  5. A Reindeer’s antlers grow to be 3 feet tall. They shed their antlers in the winter, and no two Reindeer antlers look exactly the same!
  6. Reindeer use their hooves to dig for food in the snow. The outer edges of their hooves are sharp and help them walk on ice and rocks.
  7. A Reindeer can run 50 miles per hour!

That’s our lesson about Reindeer for the moment. Come to our Holiday event and learn more! Yukon Cornelius will be on hand to introduce you to the live Reindeer, give you more information about them, and answer questions. Bring friends and family, and take some photos while you are there!

Reindeer Crown Vet 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

We look forward to seeing you!  Don’t forget your camera!

Joe Martins, DVM, Belle Mead Animal Hospital

Joe Martins, DVM, Belle Mead Animal Hospital

Joe Martins, DVM, Belle Mead Animal Hospital

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Posted in Events News Veterinary Services on Nov 14, 2019 | no responses.

Belle Mead Animal Hospital was honored to be a recipient of the “Hillsborough Community Partner Award” and one of several businesses and organizations in Hillsborough Township who were recognized during the Inaugural HBA Business Appreciation Social. The event took place on November 7, 2019 at the Falcon’s Nest, Polish Falcon Club in Hillsborough, New Jersey.

The event brought the Hillsborough business community together for a year-end celebration to acknowledge and celebrate local businesses and community partners. It was hosted by the Hillsborough Economic & Business Development Commission and the Township of Hillsborough.

Hillsborough Township Mayor Frank DelCore attended the event along with municipal officials, representatives from the Economic & Business Development Commission, and local business members. Attendees were treated to a dinner buffet, live music, and cash bar. They also had an opportunity to exchange business cards and build new relationships. A “Business Resource Showcase” rounded out the event.

The evening featured a business recognition ceremony with Mayor DelCore presenting awards to local businesses. The awards included the “Hillsborough Community Partner Award,” which recognized contributions in supporting community events and the “Appreciation Award” which honored businesses and community partners for their years of service to the township.

Belle Mead Animal Hospital was also recognized with a Certificate of Recognition for being a nominee for (and eventual 2019 winner of) the Best of the Best in Somerset County, Readers’ Choice Contest by the Courier News.

Belle Mead Animal Hospital, Your Other Family Doctors

Handling Every Pet with Love Every Day!

As Certified Fear Free Professionals, our Mission is to prevent and alleviate fear, anxiety and stress in pets by inspiring and educating the people who care for them. Visit Fear Free Happy Homes here and join at no cost!

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Posted in Events General Pets News on Nov 04, 2019 | no responses.

It was another fun-filled family event for pets and people on Saturday, October 26, 2019 at the Dog Park at Ann Van Middlesworth Park in Hillsborough, New Jersey. The annual HOWL-O-Ween Dog Costume Parade took place with local girl scouts as judges.

Belle Mead Animal Hospital participated with a table full of treats and information. BMAH also donated a Gift Basket for one of the lucky costume winners. Participant check-in began at 8:30 a.m. by the Pavilion, and the Dog Costume Parade started at at 9:00 a.m. with Mayor Frank Delcore kicking it off.

The costumes this year were extremely creative. Dogs of all sizes masqueraded as lions, witches, unicorns and bats, to name a few!

The winner of the BMAH Gift Basket was Tracy Agostino with her dog Marty! Our own Vet Technician Manager, Chrissi Daniel, participated with her crew and won a few top honors! er Her Her dog Bella won the Best Medium Dog Costume award, and her dog Carson won the Best Small Dog Costume award. “The Zoo” was the Group costume winner. View more images here: https://www.facebook.com/pg/BelleMeadAnimalHospital/photos/?tab=album&album_id=2599719643422237

There was a special appearance of a Police K-9 with his handler, and our patient KayDee participated with her mom in matching costumes!  All the dog participants were dressed to impress, and even if not awarded the best in their category, they were still winners in our opinion for showing up and showing off! Thanks Hillsborough Department of Parks and Recreation for organizing another successful event. A Howling good time was had by all.

Belle Mead Animal Hospital, Your Other Family Doctors

Handling Every Pet with Love Every Day!

As Certified Fear Free Professionals, our Mission is to prevent and alleviate fear, anxiety and stress in pets by inspiring and educating the people who care for them. Visit Fear Free Happy Homes here and join at no cost!

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Posted in Exotics Veterinary Medicine Veterinary Services on Oct 11, 2019 | no responses.

If you are considering taking a pet rabbit into your home, here are a few things you need to know:

Rabbits are not rodents, they are Lagamorphs.  There are many breeds to choose from, and their typical life span is 5-13 years. Once you and your family learn about the basic care and feeding they require, a rabbit can make a nice, gentle and quiet pet.

Rabbit

There are many breeds of rabbits to choose from.

Very young bunnies may be difficult to sex in the first 4-6 months. Females can get pregnant as early as 4-9 months, and males can breed as early as 6-9 months, so be weary of adopting two bunnies at a time or you might find yourself with many more rather quickly.

Rabbits have cloudy, strong smelling urine, and healthy rabbits produce a large amount of fecal pellets daily.  However, they can be easily litter box trained.  We do recommend recycled pelleted paper like Yesterday’s News.  The litter needs to be digestible and not toxic if eaten.  Therefore, do not use corncob, walnut shell, shavings or clay litters.  These can be dangerous for your new bunny.

It’s very important to learn how to properly handle a rabbit. Improper handling can result in a struggling bunny who scratches a person or who breaks a leg, hip or back. To teach children, have them sit on the floor beside the rabbit first, and let them rub the rabbit’s belly.  The rabbit can be hypnotized this way.  Never pick a bunny up by its ears.  Rather bundle it in a blanket.  We call this a “bunny burrito.”  This will help the rabbit remain calm.

Bunny Burrito

Bunny Burrito

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To carry a rabbit, its head should be tucked into your arms and your forearms used to support the rabbit along the entire back and beneath the belly.  Cat carriers provide enough space and ventilation for travel in the car.

The proper way to hold a rabbit

The proper way to hold a rabbit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rabbits don’t require the traditional veterinary care as far as vaccines.  However, it is very important that they are examined ideally twice a year by a veterinarian in order to check weight, teeth and nails.  Rabbits will not show any obvious signs of disease. They will hide their illness even more so than other pets because they are a predatory-type species, so regular wellness exams are vital.  Exams are also an opportunity to discuss first-hand with your vet what you need to know to keep your pet healthy.

RabbitMales and females should be neutered at six months of age.  We recommend you see a veterinarian with solid Exotic Pet experience.  It’s particularly important to spay the female. If you don’t, female rabbits over the age of 4 years have a 50-80% chance of suddenly developing deadly uterine cancer.  At that point, surgery is usually not going to save your pet. Prevention is key to this disease. If they are spayed at the recommended young age, they have a 100% chance of never dying from uterine cancer or an infected uterus (pyometra).

Rabbits nibble continuously. We recommend you feed your rabbit unlimited grass hay or Timothy hay such as OXBOW.  Your rabbit should have no more than 1/8 cup of high fiber (18% or more) maintenance type pellets per 5 lbs.

You can also feed a minimum of one cup vegetables for each 4 lbs. of body weight.  You can select three different types of dark green or yellow vegetables daily such as alfalfa sprouts, basil, beet greens, broccoli leaves, Brussels sprouts, carrot and carrot tops, cilantro, collard greens, endive, green peppers, parsley, romaine lettuce, kale, outer cabbage leaves, wheatgrass, pea pods (but not peas), squash, radicchio or dandelion leaves.

You may add a small amount of fruit (up to three types) totaling 1-2 level Tbs per 5 lbs. body weight. Stick to high fiber fruits like apple, peach, plum, pear, melon, raspberry, papaya, blueberry, blackberry, strawberry and pineapple.  Avoid sugary fruits like bananas and grapes, and feed no fruits at all if dieting.

You should clean your rabbit’s cage at least once a week. Avoid the use of a water bowl, and use attachable water bottles with sipper tubes instead.  You must check their water bottle regularly, and make sure water is not dripping down their chin. They can get blue fur disease which is a pseudomonas infection spot under their chin.

Make sure they are not sitting completely on wire, as they can develop bumble foot sores which are painful and will require a veterinarian’s treatment.  Provide bedding that you can change frequently.

Because rabbits love to chew, they should not be confined all time.  However, please supervise them when out of the cage, as they are likely to chew on miscellaneous object and things like carpets.  Foot thumping is a warning signal, they can also panic scream or growl.

When it comes to illness preventive care, here are a few things to remember:

1. Urine and feces should never be allowed to accumulate in the litter box.
2. Please weigh your rabbit monthly and let your veterinarian know of the slightest weight change.
3. Regular dental care by a trained veterinarian is a must.
4. Trim nails frequently and brush your bunny’s fur 1-2 times a week (long haired breeds daily).

Rabbit

It’s important to brush your rabbit regularly, especially a long-haired breed like this one.

5. Your rabbit will experience hair balls, otherwise known as trichobezoars. Trichobezoars happen more with rabbits who are over fed and eat too many pellets and not enough hay, and groom or molt excessively, especially when stressed. These hairballs can lead to “wool block” which leads to their stomach and intestines shutting down.  That can lead to death within three days if their GI system is not jump started. It is fine to give a feline laxative (laxatone) or pineapple (not the juice) after grooming to prevent hair balls.

Regular wellness exams with your veterinarian will give you the opportunity to discuss first-hand proper care for your new friend.  Please don’t hesitate to call our office to ask a question or set up an appointment.

Joe Martins, DVM, Belle Mead Animal Hospital

 Joe Martins, DVM, Belle Mead Animal Hospital

Joe Martins, DVM, Belle Mead Animal Hospital

Posted in General Pets News Veterinary Medicine on Sep 20, 2019 | no responses.

With the growing use of Marijuana and related products across the country, it’s important for pet owners to be aware of the danger to pets. Inhalation of the smoke or ingestion of any portion of the marijuana plant (pot brownies, for example) is highly toxic to pets because of the high levels of THC in the raw product. THC is the psychoactive compound that can be lethally toxic if pets ingest this substance in any form. Pets have died, especially when owners delay telling their veterinarian, or don’t tell the veterinary team at all, about the possibility that their pet got into a marijuana product.

Doctor speaking to Client

After ingesting or inhaling, symptoms of THC toxicity include Neurologic and GI signs. Examples include CNS depression (coma), ataxia (wobbling), vomiting, tremors, and acute onset of urinary incontinence (leakage). These are the most commonly reported clinical signs of marijuana intoxication in dogs.

It’s important to contact your veterinarian soon after noticing your pet has ingested or inhaled marijuana because recovery is dose-dependent and may take 24 to 72 hours.  Remember, over-the-counter urine drug screen tests have not been validated in dogs, and false-negative results are common. In addition, over-the-counter CBD/Hemp chews and oils should have THC levels below 0.3% to be safe. However, there are lots of unregulated products flooding the market and not all CBD’s are created equal. It depends on many factors like where the product is sourced and how it is handled. Therefore, purity and sourcing is imperative for ensuring safety for the pet. We at BMAH believe that with the help of a veterinarian, Ellevet CBD chews and oils are 100% safe and beneficial for many dogs and cats with many conditions like pain, inflammation, anxiety, seizures, etc. Please discuss with your family veterinarian if you wish to include this product in your pet’s health care plan.

Belle Mead Animal Hospital, Your Other Family Doctors

Handling Every Pet with Love Every Day!

As Certified Fear Free Professionals, our Mission is to prevent and alleviate fear, anxiety and stress in pets by inspiring and educating the people who care for them.

Fear Free - Taking the Pet out of Petrified

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Posted in General Pets News Veterinary Services on Aug 14, 2019 | no responses.

Belle Mead Animal Hospital has upgraded our phone system to serve you better. Please note that old numbers stored in your personal phone history or elsewhere may no longer work. Please be sure to store our main number only – 908 874 4447 – and clear any other alternate numbers from your speed dial history. 

A reminder about scheduling appointments: Our team is trained to offer appointment times and procedures that have your pet’s best interests in mind. Therefore, communication between a BMAH team member and client is crucial for your pet’s Fear Free experience.

Specially-Abled-Pets at Belle Mead Animal Hospital

Some pets may enjoy the sights and sounds of a busy hospital reception area while waiting for their appointment time, while others may benefit staying outside with their owner upon arrival and being ushered directly into an exam room when ready. Daytime emergency cases will be given individual consideration and advice when the call is taken. 

Learn more here about Achieving Fear Free Exams for Your Pet

Belle Mead Animal Hospital, Your Other Family Doctors

Handling Every Pet with Love Every Day!

As Certified Fear Free Professionals, our Mission is to prevent and alleviate fear, anxiety and stress in pets by inspiring and educating the  people  who care for them. 

Fear Free - Taking the Pet out of Petrified
Posted in News on Jul 16, 2019 | no responses.

The Hillsborough YMCA offers week-long specialty camps throughout the summer, introducing the children to a variety of subjects. One such camp called Future Vets under the supervision of Laura Rodriguez, Associate Program Director, gave Dr. Martins, DVM and technician Mark Sopko, the opportunity to present on July 10, 2019. 

The presentation took place in two parts: In part one, Dr. Martins gave the children an overall summary of good pet care habits and answered questions.  Part two of the presentation was handled by Mark Sopko, who gave tips on how to respect wildlife with a real life visitor, Mr. Puff Puff the skunk.

Dr Martins at YMCA Future Vet Camp

 

 

 

 

 

Part Two – Vet Tech Mark Sopko on Respecting Wildlife

Mr. Puff Puff the skunk was introduced as Mark Sopko’s own animal that he takes along to presentations for wildlife educational purposes.  The children were cautioned not to try to touch him.

Dr Martins and Mark Sopko address YMCA Vets Comp

Naturally, people and other wildlife immediately fear a skunk is going to spray using their anal scent glands.  Mark explained that if they don’t put their tail up, they can’t spray you.  However, Mr. Puff Puff doesn’t have this ability any longer because his anal scent glands have been removed, so he’s incapable of spraying. In the wild, skunks don’t have a defense other than spraying using these glands, and they can get hurt easily by wolves and coyotes when they are mostly out at night.  Even owls can attack a skunk because owls have no sense of smell.  The only thing a skunk can do is spray and run away from their predator. It takes about 10 days to recharge their anal scent glands after a skunk has sprayed in order to be able to spray again.  Therefore, they don’t spray often because they are then defenseless during that 10-day recharging period. 

Mark instructed the children that if you see a skunk, or any wildlife for that matter, simply watch it from afar and try not to disturb it. Skunks eat a lot of bugs, and they like the bad ones like hornets, that sting.  Their nails are long, and they can go into the ground and dig a burrow to sleep in and dig bugs up out of ground to eat.  Skunks come in many colors – brown and white, all white, all black, or spotted. There can be many different patterns to their coats.

Mark Sopko with Skunk at YMCA Vets Camp

Mr. Puff Puff will walk on a leash sometimes, and Mark does let him run around and play under his supervision. Mr. Puff Puff is very calm, but Mark cautioned the children the next time you see a skunk in the wild, just stay back.  If a skunk in the wild sees you coming, they will stop, slowly back up and walk away. But if you keep coming toward the skunk, he will turn around and he’ll spray you.  So with any animal, respect that animal, and that means you are being nice to them and letting them alone without bothering them.

Never stare at a wild animal, invade their space. or try and touch them. They might bite you. Same as with other people’s pets.  Puff Puff is not from the wild, he came from a skunk breeder.  Mark explained he needs a license to have a skunk of his own in order to educate others to respect wildlife.

YMCA Vet Camp Children

Questions and Answers – Skunks do bite, so you never want to try to touch one.  Mark has had Mr. Puff Puff since he was a baby and he is friendly with Mark, but any animal with teeth will bite.  Always be careful.  For food, skunks like berries, fruit and bugs, but sometimes they get into garbage and find piece of hamburger.  Sometimes they get into  bees hives. 

So what do you do if you see a skunk in the back yard? You watch through a window! 

Belle Mead Animal Hospital, Your Other Family Doctors

Handling Every Pet with Love Every Day!

As Certified Fear Free Professionals, our Mission is to prevent and alleviate fear, anxiety and stress in pets by inspiring and educating the  people  who care for them. 

My Pet is Loved at Belle Mead Animal Hospital

Fear Free - Taking the Pet out of Petrified

 

Posted in News on Jul 15, 2019 | no responses.

The Hillsborough YMCA offers week-long specialty camps throughout the summer, introducing the children to a variety of subjects. One such camp called Future Vets, under the supervision of Laura Rodriguez, Associate Program Director, gave Dr. Martins, DVM and technician Mark Sopko  the opportunity to present on July 10, 2019.  

The presentation took place in two parts: In part one, Dr. Martins gave the children an overall summary of good pet care habits, how veterinarians treat pets, and answered questions.  Part two of the presentation was by Mark Sopko, who gave tips on how to respect wildlife with some do’s and don’ts for children to remember.

Dr Martins at YMCA Future Vet Camp

 

 

 

 

 

Part One – Dr. Joe Martins, DVM on Pet Care

Dr. Martins began by explaining the importance of training cats and dogs.  He went on to discuss the need to watch your pet’s behavior and take note of subtle changes in behavior that might signal illness.

Questions veterinarians will ask when a pet comes in for an exam include: How do you think your pet is doing?  Is the pet eating normally? How many times a day do you feed him/her?  Do you have fresh water out for them every day, and are they drinking?

Dr Martins YMCA Vet Camp Children

Dr. Martins emphasized the importance of being aware of your pet’s behavior because they can’t speak in words like you and I – pets talk through their actions. If they are not feeling well, they will often display changes in behavior.  Dr. Martins explained if your pet is normally happy, wagging its tail, and eating well, then all is probably fine.  But if your pet is really lethargic, tired, staying away from you, not eating, having trouble eliminating, then what would you do?  First, children should make their parents aware that their pet is acting a little different.  Make everyone in the household aware in case he/she needs to go to the vet.

When a pet vomits, especially repeatedly, that can be another sign that something is wrong.  Pets eat things in the yard, and could ingest toxic mushrooms, mold, or even plastic.  BMAH saw a puppy who got under the bed and chewed on an old battery.  The puppy came in drooling, but the vet discovered the problem and was able to help the puppy.

Dr. Martins emphasized the most important thing the children should remember is to watch their pet’s behavior. If there is a change, the pet should be seen by a veterinarian soon to be treated. The goal is try to prevent injury and illness, and treat an ill pet as soon as possible.

YMCA Vet Camp Children

Veterinarians do many things to look after a pet. They examine the pet, prescribe medicine if needed, and perform surgery and dentistry.  Pets often have to wear nice, soft cones after surgery to prevent them from licking or gnawing on their surgical wound so it can heal properly.  One of the most important things a veterinarian can do is take care of your pet’s teeth in order to keeps their heart and kidneys healthy. 

Veterinarians also test for parasites and administer mediation.  They also recommend vaccines to protect pets against bacteria and viruses. 

Dr. Martins introduced his son Henry with their dog Smiley.  Smiley is a three year old Chihuahua/ Pomeranian/Schnauzer mix.  They did a DNA test on him and analyzed his blood to find out his ancestry.  Blood work also tells us whether or not a pet is healthy. 

Dr Martins YMCA Vet Camp

 

 

 

 

 

At the end of the pet care presentation, Dr. Martins took a few questions from the children regarding blood tests, why pets wear cones after a surgical procedure, and more about his own pet, Smiley.  Dr. Martins gave out stickers to all the children to take home, and began the introduction to Part Two of the presentation about respecting wildlife.

Belle Mead Animal Hospital, Your Other Family Doctors

Handling Every Pet with Love Every Day!

As Certified Fear Free Professionals, our Mission is to prevent and alleviate fear, anxiety and stress in pets by inspiring and educating the people who care for them.

Fear Free - Taking the Pet out of Petrified My Pet is Loved at Belle Mead Animal Hospital

Posted in News on Jun 15, 2019 | no responses.

Ready for a family night out with your dog? Come to the Somerset Patriots Bark in the Park Night on July 30, 2019.  The Belle Mead Animal Hospital team will once again host a table in the concourse at the TD Bank Ballpark in Bridgewater, and you’re invited!

Even if you don’t own a dog, come anyway! It’s a fun night out and a good opportunity to meet many of the BMAH team members. We’ll have giveaways for people and pets, information available about all our services, and live canine therapeutic exercise demonstrations with the Pet Pain Clinic team and their dogs.

If you plan to bring your dog, there are a few things you need to know: Dogs must have all their shots and be current with all their vaccinations to attend! Proof from your vet will be required at check-in outside the main gate at the ballpark. Dogs must be leashed and well socialized. Come early and participate in the pre-game Pooch Parade around the field beginning at 6:30 pm.  Click Here to complete a Somerset Patriots Waiver to print and bring with you before arriving at the game.

Game starts are 7:05 p.m. Listen for the Yappy Hour announcement and buy your dog some delicious doggie ice cream! There will be plenty of treats for you there, too! Fans can receive $5.00 Upper Box Tickets for the game by using Promo Cod Woof when purchasing tickets on-line. Get your tickets here! 

Recommended Reading:

Bark in the Park Night – A Look Back

Joe Martins, DVM, Belle Mead Animal Hospital

Joe Martins, DVM, Belle Mead Animal Hospital
Joe Martins, DVM, Belle Mead Animal Hospital
Posted in General Pets Veterinary Medicine Veterinary Services on May 15, 2019 | no responses.

Cats can suffer from respiratory distress the same as humans. A pet diagnosed with asthma is actually suffering from a recurring respiratory compromise that constricts the lung’s airways, making it difficult for your pet to breathe.

What signs do I look for?

Notice how your cat is breathing, whether at rest or at play. Cats suffering from feline asthma will display labored breathing and/or rapid breathing. Listen for any sounds of wheezing. If your cat is hard at play and begins open mouthed panting, this is a signal that a trip to your veterinarian is in order.

Notice your cat's breathing while at rest or at play

Notice your cat’s breathing while at rest or at play.

Some cats actually cough. Do not confuse coughing due to lung inflammation with the idea your cat is trying to spit up a hair ball. If your cat begins coughing, but spits up nothing or only spits up mucus, this is a sign that lung inflammation may be present.

Asthma will leave a cat with a pronounced lack of energy and weaken their whole body. Not all cats will display all symptoms at the same time, so it’s important to have your pet evaluated by a veterinarian so a proper diagnosis and treatment plan can be established. As with humans, feline asthmatic attacks can be life threatening.

How asthma affects the body

Asthma is a progressive disease. First, excess mucus forms in the lungs. Next, the airway walls swell with inflammation and can actually ulcerate. The airway muscles will eventually go into spasm, which leads to constriction.

Asthmatic airway constriction can happen spontaneously or as a type of allergic reaction. Therefore, relieving and preventing airway constriction can be life saving for your pet.

Consult your veterinarian promptly for a proper diagnosis

Once symptoms present, it is important to contact your vet who will examine your pet and order a chest x-ray and blood work. Your veterinarian might also want to run some easy parasite screening tests.

Once asthma is diagnosed, your veterinarian can prescribe medication and discuss with you how you can manage your cat’s condition.

Flovent puffer

Flovent Metered puffer

Causes of feline asthma

Feline asthma can result due to an allergic reaction that occurs when a cat breathes in any substance that stimulates their immune system. Irritants include pollen, mold, dust, and cigarette smoke. Asthma can even be a result of ingesting foods to which the cat is allergic.

Your veterinarian can help determine if other health problems are playing a role, such as heart problems, obesity, or infection with parasites. Stress can also induce asthma attacks in felines.

You can manage feline asthma at home

There is no cure for feline asthma, but there are ways to manage the condition. Your cat will require daily medication to keep the lung airways open. The easiest way to administer medication to your cat is by use of a Corticosteroid inhaler such as Flovent.

There is actually a device called the AeroKat Feline Aerosol Chamber designed to be used with the Flovent metered dose inhaler (puffer) in order to deliver the medication to your cat.

Aerokat Chamber and puffer

Aerokat Chamber and Flovent puffer

When the AeroKat chamber is attached to the puffer, it allows your cat to breathe normally and inhale the aerosol medication deep into your cat’s lungs.

Your cat may be resistant at first, but your veterinarian or technician can show you how to calmly approach your pet.  Take it slow, and once your cat starts receiving the medication and begins to feel better, your cat will actually allow you to administer treatments daily without cause for alarm.

cat and pufferCat gets used to flovent

Administering flovent with the AeroKat Chamber

Administering flovent with the AeroKat Chamber

Read more about the AeroKat Feline Aerosol Chamber and view additional photos on the AeroKat website.

Feel free to call our office if you have further questions or notice symptoms in your cat.  We are here to help.

Dr. Joe Martins, DVM, Belle Mead Animal Hospital

Dr. Joe Martins, DVM, Belle Mead Animal Hospital

Dr. Joe Martins, DVM, Belle Mead Animal Hospital